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, a discussion about the ongoing civil war in syria. that hearing a military conflict. then a panel on housing assistance to low-income renters. >> on tomorrow morning's "washington journal", a look at whether medicare and social security should be part of negotiations on fiscal cliff. we will talk with john larson on how house democrats take on the issue and stephen ola and christina martin and david john of the heritage foundation, on the long-term solvency of social security. "washington journal" is live every morning on c-span at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> the white house was very controversial as most americans were. >> it was designed for appellate, but americans were having a pellets. it was not particularly awe-inspiring. a european diplomat told the congress that it was neither large or are of the awe-inspiring nature. to . >> "new york times" critic kitty goldberg gathered photographs in history on sunday evening at 730 eastern and pacific on c-span3 american history tv. >> president obama this evening said the u.s. now recognizes the main syrian opposition group as the legitimate represe
, secretary panetta, since president obama made a statement about syria and chemical weapons again and secretary clinton did, we understand the red line, but the world this week certainly growing concern about syria's potential use of chemical weapons. can we ask you your view on this, how concerned are you? how imminent are your concerns? should assad believe that his weapons are sheltered and safe from potential response, a potential military action by anyone? >> well, without commenting on the specific intelligence that we have with regards to the chemical weapons, i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned that as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, that the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. the whole world is watching. the whole world's watching very closely. the president of the united states has made very clear that there will be cons qenszs. -- consequences. there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a terrible mistake by using these chemical weapons on their open people. i'm not going to s
on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his unusual prescience congressman royce also foreseen many of the developments we witnessed of late in the midd
the opportunity to diverse, talk about afghanistan, bahrain, syria, talk about this, that, and so the agenda has to be narrow as a need of focusing on the issue of the principle concern. that's one. that's con accept issue, as far as i can tell was never resolved. when an issue remains unresolved, the status quo revails. i suspect, given the fact the issue of a bilateral conversation is a last ditch effort, likely to remain focused. should it be considered a last ditch effort? i don't think so. you talk about years of decision, the year of that, the year of that. we have more time on this issue. it's a paradoxical one. think about it as not having the time, yet, there's always more time. you know, everybody, so this is in 2008, 2009, somehow this issue seems to have within its urgency a degree of time flexibility. i don't know how to explain that. we have had bilateral discussions before in october 2009, most collectly. if there's a bilateral one to take place, which tends to condition the agenda that's going to be discussed. >> marina, bringing you in on this, ray said we need a sense of modest
upon so soon, but, you know, at the time, syria was looking, you know, as the sequential arab revolts came into being, there was very few places where the united states had an easy or even a conceivable influence -- edge to come in and do something where the consequences were not dramatic. they were at least, you know, there could be a pos five, you know, of course, egypt, a long-time ally anchor in the middle east, supportive of israel, and tunisia was a little bit, but, by that point, already crossed the threshold and ali was out, and syria, the comparisons with libya are quite, you know, very different. it's a multisectarian society with lots and lots of, you know, connections to other powers into which are iran, lebanon, israel, you know, where disrupting or changing that relationship could have all sorts of consequences which are unknown. libya presented a -- was unique that that the libyans -- there was a popular uprising, there was a program that had been put forth by a small group of people who had put themselves forward instead of on the first unofficial, then increasingly of
of syria eventually. so we have to be very careful. be part of the settlement, with a gap between what people think about the settlement out of court and the jury-ish community and about the reality. maybe you can tell me, do you know what is the actual percentage of settlement of jewish homes occupying land in judea and samaria? sound settlement, what is actual on the ground that she had occupied the lands? anyone? >> is 3%. i wish it was 50, 90 or 100%. but it's not the case. it is vacant. the idea that the jews cannot leave, because we do not have peace i do not accept it. to date israel with arab israelis, 20% in the week. they live like i live, vote like i vote and nobody tell them if you've not lived there, you have to move out. we have to get to the understanding that it's not about the settlement. it's much deeper than that. [inaudible] >> that is the question? i am 41, ma'am. i do not -- and said what you want. did you get peace? what did it get? [inaudible] >> i think my point is very clear that history has told us we cannot wait and we cannot get to a point when people speak
the morning talking about syria. the regime with one of the large stockpiles of chemical weapons in the world and biological weapons. a man who has slaughtered 40,000 as some people and clearly is capable of slaughtering many, many more. and i certainly learned a lot from these individuals who are sitting here. one thing i learned just the other day which i was aware of actually from the board is that since world war ii in the least has seen more weapons of mass destruction attacks than any other place on earth. just to go through the list here which may or may not be aware of, egyptians use toggle weapons against yemen between 1963 and 1967. in 1986 the iraqis used chemical weapons against iranians and it is reported that iranians use chemical weapons against iraqis. in 1987 as a chemical weapons against chad. and, of course, as most of you remember, saddam hussein used mustard gas against the kurds. and those of the years when the middle east was stable. think about that. that was when stability brought. well, now we're in the middle of the great arab revolt. the great arab revolt means tha
. another example is syria. there al qaeda in iraq seeks to establish a long-term dream. by fighting alongside the syrian opposition groups the members are working to hijack the longer struggle to suit their own extremist needs. last week we designated on the front of the ail yes, sir of aca i which is already listed as a foreign terrorist terrorist organization. as they try to wrap themselves in the legitimate sei of the we called it a warning to support the opposition to the syrian people and not help the terrorist group. to add to the list of new challenges, in west africa the loosely organized of collection of factions who have some ties to -- public sympathy. the number in sophistication to the attacks increasing and while the group focusing principally on local nigeria issues -- iranian revolutionary guard and teheran's ally hezbollah. in addition to the critical support that hezbollah are providing for serious assad regime, over the past year, there's been a significant escalation in iranian-backed terrorism. hezbollah's activity has reached an tempo unseen since the 1990s wit
you. saturday night at 10:00 p.m. eastern on c-span2 p. >>> leon panetta on the syria government response against the rebel. the remarking game at the joint briefing with the veteran affair secretary eric shinseki on efforts to assist military personnel reentering life. if no agreement is reached on the fiscal cliff. this twenty five minute event took police at the veteran affair offices in washington, d.c. >>> thank you, tommy. first, let me thank secretary panetta for the unwavering support for the here at the va and the men and women who wear and have worn the uniform of the nation. our close partnership with the immediating we had -- meeting we had today on their behalf has never been more important as it is today. as we enter the holiday season i want to thank the men and whoim spend their holiday away from the families defending the nation. we're grateful for their the service and sacrifice. as we have discussed very little what we do here at va -- most of what we work on originated in dodd and that's why achieving our priorities at va requires the close and collaborative w
to the turkish border. a stark warning to the syria's president bush are al-assad to cease the air strikes and fighting against the rebels that have played into the turkish territory. we can't spend a lot of time worrying about whether that secretary panetta said dr. words. but in an interview with esquire, he said that he invited kim jong il over for dinner and he cooked for him, served him a glass of moreni and tried to understand how he thinks. clearly that all the loving secretary of defense is a complex man. his list of accomplishments over 74 years span two branches of government, education and even a little bit of labor on his california ranch. before taking office as the 23rd secretary of defense on july 4th, 2011, secretary panetta served more than two years as the cia director. after three years as the chief of staff to president clinton, secretary leon panetta and his wife could directed the leon and sylvia panetta institute for public police at california state university at monterey bay a nonpartisan center to promote public service. he served eight terms in congress rising in
better, but by that point it had crossed the threshold. syria, the comparisons with libya are quite, you know, it's very different. it's multi sectarian society with lots and lots of connections to other plot powers . lebanon, israel, disrupting or changing that relationship could have all sorts of consequences which are unknown. so libya presented -- was unique in that the libyans have a popular uprising. there was a program that had been put forth by a small group of people who had put themselves forward as sort of first unofficial but increasingly official spokesman of the libyan people. this was an opportunity for essentially president obama and the united states that makes some good on much of the content of the 2009 speech which is very important. i think people are potentially losing sight of that. the second take away is the question of intelligence and what we have known about what is going on in libya for the past 42 years and is remarkably little. you know, this is, i think also a symptom of a particular country that goes into it sanctions, blackouts because once camino, that
northeast asia and the middle east. the conflict in syria is bringing a violent end to a regime that harbors a large stockpile of chemical and biological weapons, and extremists seek to destabilize a nuclear-armed pakistan. increasing military or spending -- military spending by rising powers in the asia pacific region and turmoil across the middle east and north africa are altering the strategic landscape. at the same time, the nature of military conflict is changing because of the new technologies like cyber and the proliferation of missiles and wmd. we are seeing potential adversaries, state and nonstate actors alike, acquire more advanced hybrid and high-end capabilities designed to frustrate the conventional advantages of our armed forces. this means that the military services must remain vigilant, they must remain strong, they must remain prepared to operate in a way that differs significantly from the past. we will continue to face terrorism and deadly attacks by ieds. but we must also be ready for more capable adversaries to a attack our forces and our homeland in cyberspace. to atta
warning to syria's president bashar al-assad to cease the airstrikes and fighting against syrian rebels that have bled into turkish territory. we can't spend a lot of time worrying about whether -- secretary panetta said afterwards. yet an interview with esquire, he said if he invited kim jong-un over for dinner he would serve him a glass of wine and try to understand how the guy things. clearly the piano playing dog loving secretary of defense is a complex man. his list of accomplishments over 74 years spans two branches of government, education and even a little bit of foreign labor on his california ranch. before taking office as the 23rd secretary of defense on july 4, 2011, secretary panetta served more than two years as cia director. after three years as chief of staff to president clinton, secretary panetta and his wife sylvia codirected the leon and sylvia panetta institute for public poli-sci california state university at monterey bay, nonpartisan senator -- center to promote public service. he served eight terms in congress, rising in 1989 to chairman of the house budget co
are seeing them play a more active and positive role in international diplomacy. in syria we have work to do. you see where we are headed with respect to styria based on secretary clinton's recent comments but china is strategic, china has strong interest in managing its ascension as a global power, not the only rising power in the neighborhood. it is something that we share. we believe both we, the united states, and the community of democracies have the ability to strategically put that together and do it based on the first two principles and partnerships. >> we just don't have a large advertising campaign. i just want to comment on china's syria plan. it has nothing to do with syria which is quite a separate issue. it has everything to do with wounding a america. this -- china and russia have got together and overtures were sent to delhi to send some sort of needlework if you want to use that word and india thankfully has resisted and keeps its options more nuanced and flexible. china's natural game, dr. kissinger has three chapters in his book. the interesting thing about that game is it
, concerned about egypt, concerned about syria. we are concerned about azerbaijan, armenia, and georgia, and the gulf states, especially bahrain right now. so i will end up by just saying that this is going to be probably my last hearing as chairman of this committee. my good friend, greg, and msha my other colleagues will do everything they can to make sure we continue to pursue this issue to make sure that not only the region is secure but our interests, united states of america's interests are safe as we'll. without i yield to my colleague, mr. meeks. >> thank you, mr. chairman. and i want to thank you for holding as you said this most important hearing. but i also want to say to a degree sad, that because this probably will be your last hearing here in the united states house of representatives after almost three decades of service to our country, and we want to salute you for that. some, you know, maybe with regret not having used to stick around anymore. but we indeed are going to miss you, and i have to say that it's been an honor and a personal privilege for me to sit as a ranki
and you will have situations where radical extremist groups can hijack egypt or libya or syria or elsewhere were you don't have a strong push back which is what i'm suggesting we and our allies in the west need to help provide , support to these brave liberals and moderates in the muslim world who do want to push back but just need the tools to be able to do so. >> try and answer to that question. died and liberty. i think it goes to of the idea that in the concept of god that we have and the judeo-christian approach, there is a sole that each individual has a soul. and that means that each individual is an individual. there are no two alike. and that is the basis for quality. because that means no matter how strong you are, how bright you are, how rich you are, it doesn't matter. you have a soul. i have a soul. we are equal in that sense. that is the case than you have to have liberty because the individual, there is nothing like that individual's own decision to move the decision maker. that gets into the economics of things that we talk about in the public forum. so that is
on right now in syria, some saying we had to armed the rebels. but anyway let me, i have often said that over the years our diplomats are really the unsung heroes of the united states security. they should no longer be unsung. the attacks on our mission and benghazi's should tell congress to better recognize that her diplomat are critical to our nation's security and that we must do better to ensure they have security. it is time for us to acknowledge not just with our words but also with our deeds the importance and the danger some of america's finest public servants face abroad, with a over 80 -- at any given time. our diplomats are often in the same kind of harm's way as our military is. without the same kind of body armor and firepower to protect themselves. we here in congress have a role to play in giving them the resources, the respect and attention they deserve. i can't tell you how many times that i have traveled and i meet with and ambassador who is trying to juggle their budget. they're trying to figure out and so oftentimes they request, they want to figure out, if there
between instability and central africa and the global terrorist threat. but from afghanistan to syria to iran to north korea, we also must recognize the existence of demonstrate actors and regimes that directly threaten the united states and our allies. therefore, we must ensure that the our military is sufficiently resourced and national leaders prioritize our defense resources toward efforts that are appropriate for the u.s. military and our national vital security interest. i look forward to learning more about the situation on the ground as well as what the u.s. government is doing to address the situation in the drc. mr. smith? >> thank you, mr. chairman. i thank you very much for taking the time to hold the hearing. it's a very important issue, as you can described the situation in the eastern drc is dire. it's largest humanitarian crisis i think too few people have heard of. and some estimate of the war going over the course of the last fifteen to twenty years. and nearly 5 million people have been killed. many more wounded, injured, raped. it's a place are a lot of people are
'll continue to take. as bill said, the board report takes a clear-eyed look at syria, systemic problems for which we take responsibility, and that we have already gun to fix. we are grateful for the recommendations from the team. we accept every one of them, all 29 recommendations. .. specific action items. will assign every single one to the response for the bureau if immediate implementation and several will be completed by the end of the calendar year. implementation of each and every recommendation will be underway by the time the next secretary of state takes office. there will be no higher priority for the department in the coming weeks and months. should we require more resources to execute them we will work closely with the congress ensure they are met. as i said secretary hillary clinton wants us to implement the findings and do no more. let me offer clear specifics. for measure 200 years the united states has relied on host nations to provide securities for embassies and consulates. today in the environment we have to take a new and harder look at the exaibility and of our hos
rights violators wherever they might be, whether in russia or syria or sudan or north korea or china or any other country. in other words, the senate committee-approved bill wisely adopted a global magnitsky standard. the reasoning for this is sound. because while the mechanism of u.s. visa denial for human rights violators was inspired by a single case in a single nation, the principles that it seeks to advance are universal. this bipartisan committee bill, unlike the house-passed version of the magnitsky act that we will soon vote on, does not single out russian human rights violators for visa denial but would apply the visa denial mechanism to people from any country who violate important human rights standards. the united states should be clear and firm in its commitment to protecting human rights. wherever the violation occur. and to holding those who violate those rights accountable to the best of our ability. including denying them visas to come to our country. human rights do not end at the borders of russia and anyone who violates those standards as so many did so blatantly
at syria where u.s. is at risk, a serious conflict there with the chemical weapons, obviously, real concerns about iran as well. is the shift occurring before the job is done in the middle east? >> well, i would go back to the president's strategy on this, and take a look at it that didn't say we'd shift everything we have in the military or in the government into the asia pacific. it prioritized the asia pacific, but it talked about an enduring requirement to be in a present and security role in the middle east as well. you know, we're talking about, i think, a near term perspective on this, you know, we're -- we seed a glide slope in afghanistan. yes, the middle east is -- has issues that and has historically had issues that will require, i think, u.s., obviously, u.s. leadership, but also requires certain level of military security over time, and we will have to balance that as we look at the size and nature of our forestructure, and, you know, what we have, the assets we have to be able to accomplish it, but i'm convinced we can do both in the long run, and i'm convinced we're o
ability to meet, just as we found it ethnic cleansing in the balkans, we can stop the slaughter in syria. just as they nurture the democratic transitions after communism fell in eastern europe, we support the sources of freedom in the middle east today. just as we were able to prevail in the long struggle against the soviet union during the cold war, we can prevail in the global conflict with islamist extremism and terrorism that we were forced in to predict terrorist attacks of september 11, 2001. but all that to will require leadership in the united states senate. it will require leaders who will stand against the siren song of isolationism, who will defend our defense and foreign assistance budget, who will support when necessary the use of america's military power against our enemies in the world and who will have the patience and determination when the public grows weary to see our battles through until they are one. mr. president, i first stepped foot in this chamber, sit years ago in the summer of 1963 comments by a thick so many in my generation that president john f. kennedy and
. another example is syria. al qaeda and iraq seeks to establish a long-term presence under the pseudonym. they fighting alongside armed syrian opposition groups from the members are working to hijack a long repressed nations struggle to suit their own extremist needs. last week redesignated an alias at aqa, which is already of course listed at foreign terrorist organizations. as they wrap themselves in legitimacy of the opposition, we called terrorists out of a warning to all who wish to support the opposition to the syrian people and not help a terrorist group put down roots. to add to this list of new challenges in west africa was a nice collection of mrs. booker rob continue to carry at attacks in nigeria from exporting agreements in northern nature as to when recruits and public sympathy. the number and sophistication is increasing and while the group focuses on nigerian issues that are scum at every port is developing financial with other extremists and rushes to operate on a bigger stage. at this point i need to make something of a detour because while nonstate actors such as al qa
the potential for further unrest in syria, and egypt and across the middle east, it seems to me that that's a question that is really critical as we look at how we continue to provide protection for our personnel on the ground. >> well, senator, first with regard to the specific issue of benghazi. it was addressed in the report. the arb's judgment, there was not enough time to have use military force to respond to make a difference in that situation. but you raise a very good broader question and service on we will be working to with our colleagues and the pentagon and elsewhere in the administration. >> thank you and again the potential for unrest across the middle east i would hope that we would follow up on the specific question because it seems to me critical as we look at the situation going forward. and i will just conclude by adding my personal thanks and appreciation to senator lugar. it has truly been an honor to serve with you, angeli the tremendous legacy for this committee and for the country. thank you. >> senator shaheen, thank you. let me just say that i've thought a lot ab
questions. all parties should recognize the need for unity in the coming year when events in iran, syria, afghanistan, north korea, and other locations may test american national security in extreme ways. i commend each of you, my senate colleagues, for the commitment that led you to stand for election in the united states senate to begin with. running for office is a difficult endeavor that is usually accompanied by great personal risk and cost. each one of you is capable of being a positive force for changing the tone of debate in our country. each one of you has a responsibility not only to act with integrity and represent your constituents but also to make informed and imaginative choice on which good governance for our country depends. i am optimistic about our country's future. i believe that both internal divisions and external threats can be overcome. the united states will continue to serve as the inspiration for people seeking peace, freedom, and economic prosperity. and the united states senate should and will be at the forefront of this advancement. may we seek each day from
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25